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RE-TELLING ONE'S OWN: STORYTELLING AMONG THE APŚAALOOKE (CROW INDIANS)

Rodney Frey
Plains Anthropologist
Vol. 28, No. 100 (May 1983), pp. 129-135
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25668352
Page Count: 7
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RE-TELLING ONE'S OWN: STORYTELLING AMONG THE APŚAALOOKE (CROW INDIANS)
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Abstract

The following article suggests the role oral literature and storytelling has in contributing to the learning and perpetuation of the cultural identity of the contemporary Apśaalooke (Crow Indians). The stories not only describe the world view of the Apśaalooke, presenting it to the listeners, but given the manner language is understood and applied and the techniques of storytelling, they engage the listeners in a participation in the events and characters of the narrative. During the telling of a story, the world-view themes are thus experientially participated in by the listeners.

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