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THE PRODUCTION OF INDIAN-USE AND SOUVENIR BEADWORK BY CONTEMPORARY INDIAN WOMEN

Mary Jane Schneider
Plains Anthropologist
Vol. 28, No. 101 (August 1983), pp. 235-245
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25668378
Page Count: 11
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THE PRODUCTION OF INDIAN-USE AND SOUVENIR BEADWORK BY CONTEMPORARY INDIAN WOMEN
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Abstract

An analysis of the production of beaded items by Kiowa Indian women demonstrates some of the processes involved in making a transition from a traditional tribal society to the modern world. Changes in the creative roles of Kiowa women are noted, and some of the factors which have contributed to these changes are identified. Beadwork, once known and practiced by most Kiowa women, is shown to have differentiated into a category of items produced by a small group of women for use within Indian society and a souvenir category, produced by many more women, for sale to non-Indians. The two groups show differences in knowledge, training, and marketing practices.

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