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Non-Mendelian determinant [ ISP ⁺] in yeast is a nuclear-residing prion form of the global transcriptional regulator Sfp1

Tatyana Rogoza, Alexander Goginashvili, Sofia Rodionova, Maxim Ivanov, Olga Viktorovskaya, Alexander Rubel, Kirill Volkov, Ludmila Mironova and Reed B. Wickner
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 107, No. 23 (June 8, 2010), pp. 10573-10577
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25681824
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Non-Mendelian determinant [
              ISP
              ⁺] in yeast is a nuclear-residing prion form of the global transcriptional regulator Sfp1
Preview not available

Abstract

Four protein-based genetic determinants or prions—[SWI⁺], [MCA], [OCT⁺], and [MOT3⁺]—are recent additions to the list of well-known Saccharomyces cerevisiae prions, [PSI⁺], [URE3], and [PIN⁺]. A rapid expansion of this list may indicate that many yeast proteins can convert into heritable prion forms and underscores a problem of prion input into cellular physiology. Here, we prove that the global transcriptional regulator Sfp1 can become a prion corresponding to the prion-like determinant [ISP⁺] described earlier. We show that SFP1 deletion causes an irreversible [ISP⁺] loss, whereas increased SFP1 expression induces [ISP⁺] appearance. Cells that display the [ISP⁺] phenotype contain the aggregated form of Sfp1. Indeed, these aggregates demonstrate a nuclear location. We also show that the phenotypic manifestation of Sfp1 prionization differs from the manifestation of SFP1 deletion. These properties and others distinguish [ISP⁺] from yeast prions described to date.

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