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Florida Epidemic Intelligence Service Program: The First Five Years, 2001–2006

Patti Ragan, Alan Rowan, Joann Schulte and Steven Wiersma
Public Health Reports (1974-)
Vol. 123, SUPPLEMENT 1: Competency-Based Epidemiologic Training in Public Health Practice (2008), pp. 21-27
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25681996
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Florida Epidemic Intelligence Service Program: The First Five Years, 2001–2006
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Abstract

The Florida Epidemic Intelligence Service Program was created in 2001 to increase epidemiologic capacity within the state. Patterned after applied epidemiology training programs such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Epidemic Intelligence Service and the California Epidemiologic Investigation Service, the two-year postgraduate program is designed to train public leaders of the future. The long-term goal is to increase the capacity of the Florida Department of Health to respond to new challenges in disease control and prevention. Placement is with experienced epidemiologists in county health departments/consortia. Fellows participate in didactic and experiential components, and complete core activities for learning as evidence of competency. As evidenced by graduate employment, the program is successfully meeting its goal. As of 2006, three classes (n=18) have graduated. Among graduates, 83% are employed as epidemiologists, 67% in Florida. Training in local health departments and an emphasis on graduate retention may assist states in strengthening their epidemiologic capacity.

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