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Human Territoriality: A Theory

Robert D. Sack
Annals of the Association of American Geographers
Vol. 73, No. 1 (Mar., 1983), pp. 55-74
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2569346
Page Count: 20
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Human Territoriality: A Theory
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Abstract

Territoriality is a means of affecting (enhancing or impeding) interaction and extends the particulars of action by contact. Territoriality is defined here as the attempt to affect, influence, or control actions, interactions, or access by asserting and attempting to enforce control over a specific geographic area. A theory of territoriality is developed that contains ten potential consequences and fourteen primary combinations of consequences to territorial strategies. It is hypothesized that any instance of territoriality will draw from among these. Specific consequences and combinations are predicted to occur in particular social-historical contexts.

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