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Learning by Doing: A Simulation for Teaching How Congress Works

Eric C. Sands and Allison Shelton
PS: Political Science and Politics
Vol. 43, No. 1 (January 2010), pp. 133-138
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25699308
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Learning by Doing: A Simulation for Teaching How Congress Works
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Abstract

Teachers of political science have increasingly recognized the utility of classroom simulations to provide students with an active-learning experience to enhance learning outcomes. Our article builds on this growing trend by proposing a congressional simulation to help students understand the complexities and nuances of the lawmaking process. Specifically, the simulation aids students in identifying the deliberative aspects of congressional policymaking, appreciating the complicated process involved in a bill becoming a law, understanding the multifaceted ways in which self-interest guides the decisions of congressional actors, and challenging student cynicism about Congress as an institution.

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