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Post-Westphalia and Its Discontents: Business, Globalization, and Human Rights in Political and Moral Perspective

Michael A. Santoro
Business Ethics Quarterly
Vol. 20, No. 2 (April 2010), pp. 285-297
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25702399
Page Count: 13
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Post-Westphalia and Its Discontents: Business, Globalization, and Human Rights in Political and Moral Perspective
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Abstract

This article examines the presuppositions and theoretical frameworks of the "new-wave" "Post-Westphalian" approach to international business ethics and compares it to the more philosophically oriented moral theory approach that has predominated in the field. I contrast one author's Post-Westphalian political approach to the human rights responsibilities of transnational corporations (TNCs) with my own "Fair Share" theory of moral responsibility for human rights. I suggest how the debate about the meaning of corporate human rights "complicity" might be informed by the fair share theory. While I point out that Post-Westphalians and moral philosophers may have fundamental disagreements about basic concepts such as legitimacy, justice, and democratic deliberation, I conclude that the Post-Westphalians have made a major contribution to the expansion of the field by presenting business ethicists with an opportunity to inform and guide debates about the potential future course of transnational governance.

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