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Theta burst stimulation dissociates attention and action updating in human inferior frontal cortex

Frederick Verbruggen, Adam R. Aron, Michaël A. Stevens, Christopher D. Chambers and Edward E. Smith
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 107, No. 31 (August 3, 2010), pp. 13966-13971
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25708833
Page Count: 6
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Theta burst stimulation dissociates attention and action updating in human inferior frontal cortex
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Abstract

Everyday circumstances require efficient updating of behavior. Brain systems in the right inferior frontal cortex have been identified as critical for some aspects of behavioral updating, such as stopping actions. However, the precise role of these neural systems is controversial. Here we examined how the inferior frontal cortex updates behavior by combining reversible cortical interference (transcranial magnetic stimulation) with an experimental task that measures different types of updating. We found that the right inferior frontal cortex can be functionally segregated into two subregions: a dorsal region, which is critical for visual detection of changes in the environment, and a ventral region, which updates the corresponding action plan. This dissociation reconciles competing accounts of prefrontal organization and casts light on the neural architecture of human cognitive control.

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