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World Order: Law and Justice or Power and Force?

Robert N. Wilkin
American Bar Association Journal
Vol. 33, No. 1 (January 1947), pp. 18-21
Published by: American Bar Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25715810
Page Count: 4
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World Order: Law and Justice or Power and Force?
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Abstract

The basic issue as to the future world order is clearly and simply stated by Judge Wilkin: Shall it be a juridical order, based on law and impartial adjudication or a manipulation of world affairs at the political level, with force and arbitrary power as the decisive factor? Judge Wilkin's long-run objectives are those for which our Association has contended for many years; his appraisal of The United Nations is not that which the House of Delegates voted unanimously on October 30, (32 A.B.A.J. 871). In accordance with the Journal's policy of making available to our readers informed but differing views that are consistent with the Association's purposes, we are privileged to publish his reasoned statement. A noteworthy feature of his Atlantic City address before the Section of International and Comparative Law on October 29 is the distinction which he draws between "world government now", which would be a unitary super-government or super-state (opposed by the House of Delegates) and "government of world affairs", which will evolve from the progressive growth and strengthening of a body of world law and of agencies of international control which are suitable and sufficient to cope with conditions beyond the authority of any one Nation or group of Nations. Judge Wilkin envisages the ultimate supremacy of law and of impartial courts to enforce law, as central and basic in the "government of world affairs". A sketch of our contributor, who is a valued member of the Journal's new Advisory Board, is in "Lawyers in the News" in this issue.

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