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Message from Britain: The Lord Chancellor's Address in Cleveland

American Bar Association Journal
Vol. 33, No. 12 (December 1947), pp. 1177-1180, 1245-1248
Published by: American Bar Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25716218
Page Count: 8
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Message from Britain: The Lord Chancellor's Address in Cleveland
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Abstract

In his address at the Annual Dinner of our Association in Cleveland on September 25, the Lord Chancellor of England faced and discussed the questions which he knew were in the minds of his auditors as to what has been taking place in his country under the Labor Government. With the skill of a trained advocate and forensic orator, he pleaded his case boldly and without apology. His picture was of a brave people who, "weary and perhaps rather disillusioned", cherish their traditions and hold fast to their ideals of liberty and law, yet are driven by the aftermath of their great sacrifices in war to try out what he termed a "planned economy". He evoked hearty applause by his forthright assertions that political considerations never enter into his selection of lawyers for the bench. Because his address was an admirable demonstration of the art of after-dinner speaking on subjects of great moment, we publish it from the stenographic transcript, excising only a little of the bantering and pleasantries that could have point only in the mood of the occasion.

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