Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

A World Constitution: Analysis of the Draft by the Hutchins Committee

Ray Garrett, Jr.
American Bar Association Journal
Vol. 34, No. 7 (JULY 1948), pp. 563-566, 640
Published by: American Bar Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25716486
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A World Constitution: Analysis of the Draft by the Hutchins Committee
Preview not available

Abstract

The Journal has from time to time, during several years past, published material which assisted its readers in studying the problems of international organization for peace and law and the ways in which some of these problems are being dealt with by legal draftsmen. Instances are the Charter of the United Nations and the Statute of the World Court in 1945, the Inter-American Treaty of Reciprocal Assistance (33 A.B.A.J. 1058; October, 1947), the Brussels Agreement of Western European Powers (34 A.B.A.J. 406; May, 1948), the articles contributed by Samuel J. Kornhauser and John C. Ranney on world government from opposing points of view (33 A.B.A.J. 563, 567; June, 1947), and reviews of many books dealing with various aspects of international organization and world law. With the persistent agitation for world government and the natural belief of many lawyers that such a project can be usefully discussed only if it is first put in a definitive form, the appearance of a considered draft of a Constitution for a Federal Republic of the World, prepared by a Committee headed by Chancellor Robert M. Hutchins, of the University of Chicago, a former Dean of the Yale Law School, is a challenge to lawyers to study the subject further and form and express their own views about it, in their respective communities. Obviously, a great deal of the persistent agitation and propaganda which is taking place throughout the country on the subject is not based on a consideration of the legal and practical difficulties which arise when it is sought to translate a hope, a fear, or an ideal, into an organic law to govern men and nations. As is pointed out more fully in an editorial in this issue, lawyers in particular owe to the public the duty of seeing to it the sponsors of such discussions in their communities shall "come down to earth" and face the realities of specific and practicable structure and provisions. In furtherance of such a study of the subject, we publish this trenchant article, which analyzes and comments on the draft submitted by the Hutchins Committee.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
563
    563
  • Thumbnail: Page 
564
    564
  • Thumbnail: Page 
565
    565
  • Thumbnail: Page 
566
    566
  • Thumbnail: Page 
640
    640