Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Fifty Years of the Juvenile Court: An Evaluation

Nochem S. Winnet
American Bar Association Journal
Vol. 36, No. 5 (May 1950), pp. 363-366
Published by: American Bar Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25717233
Page Count: 4
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Fifty Years of the Juvenile Court: An Evaluation
Preview not available

Abstract

In 1899, after an eight-year struggle in the state's General Assembly, the first juvenile court law went into effect in Illinois. Today, over half a century later, there are over three thousand juvenile courts, located in every state of the Union. In this article Judge Winnet takes stock of the juvenile courts today. He finds that the original objective was sound, and that much has been accomplished. He also finds weaknesses and makes valuable suggestions for eliminating them.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
363
    363
  • Thumbnail: Page 
364
    364
  • Thumbnail: Page 
365
    365
  • Thumbnail: Page 
366
    366