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Legal Education for What? A Lawyer's View of the Law Schools

James Thomas Connor
American Bar Association Journal
Vol. 37, No. 2 (February 1951), pp. 119-122, 174-175
Published by: American Bar Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25717547
Page Count: 6
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Legal Education for What? A Lawyer's View of the Law Schools
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Abstract

Mr. Connor believes that it is time for a reappraisal of our law school curricula and methods. He doubts whether the case method is doing the primary job of the law school—the preparation of men to practice law. And he declares that the trend toward training in specialized fields such as taxation, trade regulations and public utility law is resulting in too great a departmentalizing of the law.

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