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Electronics in Court: Shorthand Reporters v. Recording Machines

Everett G. Rodebaugh
American Bar Association Journal
Vol. 39, No. 4 (April 1953), pp. 287-291, 305
Published by: American Bar Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25718381
Page Count: 6
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Electronics in Court: Shorthand Reporters v. Recording Machines
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Abstract

In a mechanical age, it is perhaps easy to become overenthusiastic about the products of man's ingenuity. A mechanical court reporter, a sound recording machine, picking up every word and phrase uttered during a trial would seem to be the ultimate in accuracy and infallibility. There are certain disadvantages in relying upon sound recordings that make it desirable to wait before all court reporters are replaced with robots. While Mr. Rodebaugh's subject is not a legal one, it is nevertheless a subject that concerns lawyers and judges.

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