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Training Lawyers for the Future: Some Theories About the Practice of Law

Charles B. Nutting
American Bar Association Journal
Vol. 41, No. 7 (JULY 1955), pp. 607-611
Published by: American Bar Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25719253
Page Count: 5
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Training Lawyers for the Future: Some Theories About the Practice of Law
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Abstract

Speaking at the dedication of the new building of the Hastings College of Law in San Francisco several months ago, Mr. Nutting, then President of the Association of American Law Schools, argued that the constant change in the practice of law, brought about by our ever-increasingly complex society, requires a legal education that is theoretical and flexible. A narrow, "practical" legal education, which would give the student information about the location of the washroom in the courthouse and teach him the nickname of the court's clerk, would in fact be the most impractical education possible, he declares. Mr. Nutting's discussion is a thoughtful, self-critical answer from the law schools to some of the recent criticism of legal education.

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