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The Butler Amendment: An Analysis by a Non-Lawyer

John R. Schmidhauser
American Bar Association Journal
Vol. 43, No. 8 (AUGUST 1957), pp. 714-717, 761-764
Published by: American Bar Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25720092
Page Count: 8
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The Butler Amendment: An Analysis by a Non-Lawyer
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Abstract

The so-called Butler Amendment deals with the Supreme Court of the United States. It would fix the number of Justices at nine, provide for compulsory retirement of members of the Court at the age of 75, prohibit members of the Court from running for President, and secure the appellate jurisdiction of the Court in all cases arising under the Constitution. The provisions of the amendment, several of which have been endorsed by the House of Delegates of the Association, might easily work a considerable alteration in future history if it is adopted. Mr. Schmidhauser examines the proposal and the arguments pro and con.

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