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An Imperishable System: What the World Owes to Roman Law

Ben W. Palmer
American Bar Association Journal
Vol. 45, No. 11 (NOVEMBER 1959), pp. 1149-1152, 1220-1221
Published by: American Bar Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25720991
Page Count: 6
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An Imperishable System: What the World Owes to Roman Law
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Abstract

Mr. Palmer discusses the permanent effect of Roman law upon civilization. The entire Western world owes a great debt to the sixth-century compilers of the Corpus Juris Civilis, and Mr. Palmer shows that not only is Roman law still the basic law in most of Europe, South America, and Louisiana, but it has also greatly influenced the common law of Britain and America.

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