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Can Lawyers Trust One Another?

Austin W. Scott, Jr.
American Bar Association Journal
Vol. 49, No. 11 (NOVEMBER 1963), pp. 1108-1109
Published by: American Bar Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25722587
Page Count: 2
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Abstract

This startling and challenging question calls for an affirmative answer, Mr. Scott declares. Lawyers have too long acted out the part of distrusting and disliking their brethren on the other side. Not only is the public given a bad impression and trials are slowed down, he suggests, but lawyers may start believing what they pretend.

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