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The Use of Public Opinion Polls in Continuance and Venue Hearings

Edward F. Sherman
American Bar Association Journal
Vol. 50, No. 4 (APRIL 1964), pp. 357-362
Published by: American Bar Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25722765
Page Count: 6
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The Use of Public Opinion Polls in Continuance and Venue Hearings
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Abstract

Courts are becoming increasingly receptive to the admission of the results of public opinion polls to show community attitudes and prejudgments as to certain criminal cases in which continuances or changes of venue are sought by the defendants. Mr. Sherman concludes that polls may provide a degree of evidentiary certainty now lacking, but he warns that polls can also be tricky unless properly conducted and interpreted.

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