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Sterilization and Mental Retardation

Regina Bligh
American Bar Association Journal
Vol. 51, No. 11 (NOVEMBER 1965), pp. 1059-1063
Published by: American Bar Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25723410
Page Count: 5
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Sterilization and Mental Retardation
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Abstract

Over half the states of the Union have statutes that either require or permit human sterilization in certain cases of mental retardation. Miss Bligh examines the scientific justification for these laws, most of which were enaeted in the period from 1905 to 1929, and finds that modern thinking challenges the idea that mental retardation is hereditary.

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