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Why Not a National Bar Examination?

Gene A. Petersen
American Bar Association Journal
Vol. 55, No. 5 (MAY 1969), pp. 426-431
Published by: American Bar Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25724777
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Why Not a National Bar Examination?
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Abstract

If a lawyer who has been in practice for a number of years wishes to relocate in another state, he can be admitted to that state's bar on motion. But the young lawyer, who is unlikely to be certain of where he wishes to locate or what type of law he wishes to practice, cannot relocate in a different state without facing another bar examination. Are state bar examinations, with their myriad variations in preparation, grading, subject coverage, quality and objectives, really necessary, or would a national examination be more fair to both the profession and the public?

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