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Criminal Law in the Seventies

James V. Brands
American Bar Association Journal
Vol. 56, No. 8 (AUGUST 1970), pp. 769-772
Published by: American Bar Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25725219
Page Count: 4
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Criminal Law in the Seventies
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Abstract

Simple changes in laws and court procedures, state and federal, are necessary to enhance the esteem accorded our criminal law by the public. In order to overcome barriers such as ignorance, mistrust and doubt and better serve the general public, the legal profession must scrutinize its procedures in several areas—arrest, bail, interrogation, trial procedure and sentencing.

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