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Legal Education and the Rule of Law

John E. Cribbet
American Bar Association Journal
Vol. 60, No. 11 (November, 1974), pp. 1363-1366
Published by: American Bar Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25726946
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Legal Education and the Rule of Law
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Abstract

Lawyers are the principal representatives of the rule of the law, and the law schools regulate admission into the profession. Legal institutions must remain stable so that public faith in the rule of law is upheld. We must have a clearer understanding of what the law schools are trying to accomplish. They must maintain their present strengths while building for the future.

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