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Reflections on the Sedition Act of 1798

Alan J. Farber
American Bar Association Journal
Vol. 62, No. 3 (March, 1976), pp. 324-328
Published by: American Bar Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25727556
Page Count: 5
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Reflections on the Sedition Act of 1798
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Abstract

Is the law of seditious libel dead? The Sedition Act of 1798 may seem like ancient stuff now, impossible under the First Amendment. But we had a First Amendment when government critics were being tried two hundred years ago, and the Supreme Court never has held directly that the Sedition Act was unconstitutional. We've come a long way, but our First Amendment armor may have a chink.

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