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Journal Article

The Maori: A Study in Resistive Acculturation

David P. Ausubel
Social Forces
Vol. 39, No. 3 (Mar., 1961), pp. 218-227
Published by: Oxford University Press
DOI: 10.2307/2573212
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2573212
Page Count: 10
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The Maori: A Study in Resistive Acculturation
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Abstract

Catastrophically defeated a century ago by British colonists, the New Zealand Maori withdrew into isolated villages and thereby resisted acculturation. Although culture contact has increased markedly since World War II, Maori adolescents are currently handicapped in implementing their academic and vocational aspirations because their elders still cling to traditional nonachievement values.

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