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The Proper Scope of Social Psychology

Kurt W. Back
Social Forces
Vol. 41, No. 4 (May, 1963), pp. 368-376
Published by: Oxford University Press
DOI: 10.2307/2573282
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2573282
Page Count: 9
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The Proper Scope of Social Psychology
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Abstract

Social Psychology is shown as having, in its rejection of grand theory, also abandoned many of its significant problems. The field of social psychology is defined in relation to sociology and psychology. The latter are each dealing with a complete logical system, which may or may not be in conflict or leave certain areas undefined. Social psychology is defined as an interstitial science covering the situations where actions of the individual and the forces of organized society interact. The need for full-range theory is shown and examples are given.

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