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Macromedusae (Cnidaria) From the Paraná Coast, Southern Brazil

M. Nogueira Jr and M.A. Haddad
Journal of Coastal Research
Special Issue No. 39. Proceedings of the 8th International Coastal Symposium (ICS 2004), Vol. II (Winter 2006), pp. 1161-1164
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25741767
Page Count: 4
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Macromedusae (Cnidaria) From the Paraná Coast, Southern Brazil
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Abstract

Brazilian macromedusae are poorly studied. About 24 species are known from Brazilian coastal waters with only three recorded in the state of Paraná: Lychnorhiza lucerna, Stomolophus meleagris and Phyllorhiza punctata. Abundance and frequency of Brazilian medusae are almost unknown. Here we present a study of species composition from the Paraná coast (25°20'-25°55'S; 48°10'-48°35'W), in southern Brazil, along with abundance and frequency data. From November 1997 to March 2002, monthly samples were made with bottom trawl from shrimp fishing boats, nets with 2 and 3 cm mesh size. Six species were collected, two of each class of the Cnidaria Medusozoa: the scyphozoans Lychnorhiza lucerna and Chrysaora lactea; the hydrozoans Olindias sambaquiensis and Rhacostoma atlantica and the cubozoans Chiropsalmus quadrumanus and Tamoya haplonema. The most abundant species was C. lactea, with 528 specimens sampled and the most frequent was L. lucerna, present in 84,4% of the samples. R. atlantica was the less abundant and frequent with only 20 specimens sampled and present in just 12,5% of the samples. Two additional scyphozoans were observed alive or stranded at several points of the study site: several Phyllorhiza punctata since the end of 2001 and Stomolophus meleagris only a few times swimming inside the Guaratuba Bay, suggesting an estuarine habit.

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