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Decentralisation: A Constitutional Mandate or Rhetoric?

BUDDHADEB GHOSH
Economic and Political Weekly
Vol. 45, No. 38 (SEPTEMBER 18-24, 2010), pp. 83-84
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25742099
Page Count: 2
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Abstract

The implementation of decentralisation reform as embodied in the 73rd and 74th amendments of the Constitution has suffered from complete negligence. The two recent articles by Oommen and Sivaramakrishnan have highlighted the inexplicable attitudes of the finance commissions and the judiciary towards decentralisation.

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