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"The George Lopez Show": The Same Old Hispano?

John Markert
Bilingual Review / La Revista Bilingüe
Vol. 28, No. 2 (MAY-AUGUST 2004-2007), pp. 148-165
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25745856
Page Count: 18
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
"The George Lopez Show": The Same Old Hispano?
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Abstract

The George Lopez Show is the first successful television show with a Latino in a leading role that features Hispanic material since Freddie Prinze's thirty-year-old sitcom, Chico and the Man. This study seeks to assess how Latinos are presented on The George Lopez Show. A content analysis reveals that the show perpetuates some of the stereotypes about Hispanics that are prevalent in the wider society. The stereotypes, however, are relatively subtle. Because the stereotypes are not overtly demeaning, the 14 percent of the Latinos who watch the show may not be offended by the negative representation. At the same time, The George Lopez Show challenges some of the stereotypes held by the wider society, prompting Anglos to view Hispanics differently and promoting pride among Latino viewers. Added depth to this conclusion was provided by focus group responses by Latinos and Anglos/blacks. This study finds that the show both perpetuates certain stereotypes while at the same time challenging them. This paper examines how the show manages to do both. In the end, however, The George Lopez Show fosters a positive image of Latinos substantially more than a negative one. The paper concludes by appraising the affect the conflicting images found on the show may have for regular viewers.

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