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Scanning probe block copolymer lithography

Jinan Chai, Fengwei Huo, Zijian Zheng, Louise R. Giam, Wooyoung Shim and Chad A. Mirkin
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 107, No. 47 (November 23, 2010), pp. 20202-20206
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25756675
Page Count: 5
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Scanning probe block copolymer lithography
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Abstract

Integration of individual nanoparticles into desired spatial arrangements over large areas is a prerequisite for exploiting their unique electrical, optical, and chemical properties. However, positioning single sub-10-nm nanoparticles in a specific location individually on a substrate remains challenging. Herein we have developed a unique approach, termed scanning probe block copolymer lithography, which enables one to control the growth and position of individual nanoparticles in situ. This technique relies on either dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) or polymer pen lithography (PPL) to transfer phase-separating block copolymer inks in the form of 100 or more nanometer features on an underlying substrate. Reduction of the metal ions via plasma results in the high-yield formation of single crystal nanoparticles per block copolymer feature. Because the size of each feature controls the number of metal atoms within it, the DPN or PPL step can be used to control precisely the size of each nanocrystal down to 4.8 ± 0.2 nm.

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