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Learning in Inclusive Classrooms

PEGGY MOHAN
Economic and Political Weekly
Vol. 45, No. 46 (NOVEMBER 13-19, 2010), pp. 16-18
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25764115
Page Count: 3
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Learning in Inclusive Classrooms
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Abstract

Private schools in Delhi that buy land for construction at concessional rates have to make 20% of their seats available for children from the economically weaker sections. Everyone, except the educationists, knows that schooling is mostly about inclusion, about becoming a part of a group that is destined for success. A teacher from one such English-medium school with four EWS students assigned to her for remedial tuitions, traces their evolution over three years from sitting in incomprehension to enthusiastic participation.

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