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Facial Stereotypes of Deviants and Judgments of Guilt or Innocence

Donald J. Shoemaker, Donald R. South and Jay Lowe
Social Forces
Vol. 51, No. 4 (Jun., 1973), pp. 427-433
Published by: Oxford University Press
DOI: 10.2307/2576687
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2576687
Page Count: 7
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Facial Stereotypes of Deviants and Judgments of Guilt or Innocence
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Abstract

This study inquires whether positive and negative facial stereotypes of criminal deviants exist and, if so, whether they are related to judgments of guilt or innocence in evidence-ambiguous situations. Photographs of middle-aged white males were used as stimuli and college undergraduates as subjects. Findings indicate that: (1) both positive and negative facial stereotypes of four types of crime exist and are crime specific; (2) negative and positive facial stereotypes are correlated with judgments of guilt or innocence for every crime considered, with negative stereotypes being more important for assessing guilt than positive stereotypes for assessing innocence with every offense except homosexuality, where the situation is reversed; and (3) males apparently use facial stereotypes in assessing guilt or innocence more than do females for every type of crime considered.

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