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THE MAGIC TRIANGLE: James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, Arno Schmidt

Friedhelm Rathjen
Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui
Vol. 11, SAMUEL BECKETT: ENDLESSNESS IN THE YEAR 2000 / SAMUEL BECKETT: FIN SANS FIN EN L'AN 2000 (2001), pp. 92-99
Published by: Editions Rodopi B.V.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25781359
Page Count: 8
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THE MAGIC TRIANGLE: James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, Arno Schmidt
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Abstract

Beckett's work looks entirely different from Joyce's, but this very dissimilarity is the result of Beckett's connection to Joyce. The dynamics at play here can be understood by applying Giordano Bruno's principle of the identity of opposites and further illustrated by comparing Beckett's reactions to Joyce to that of the German novelist Arno Schmidt. The main question is: why does Beckett, understanding and admiring Joyce's aims and instruments so well, turn away from Joyce's work, while Schmidt, misreading fundamental principles of Joyce's work and disliking some of its vital features, turns more and more towards Joyce? There are similarities between Beckett and Schmidt, too, but these have scarcely anything to do with the Joycean impact.

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