Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

DEMENTED VS. CREATIVE EMULATION IN "MURPHY"

Thomas J. Cousineau
Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui
Vol. 18, "All Sturm and no Drang": Beckett and Romanticism, Beckett at Reading 2006 (2007), pp. 355-365
Published by: Brill
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25781808
Page Count: 11
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
DEMENTED VS. CREATIVE EMULATION IN "MURPHY"
Preview not available

Abstract

Beckett's notes for Murphy in his Whoroscope Notebook, especially his distinction between a force and a guide, allow us to see in Murphy's subservience to a succession of "forces," culminating in his tragicomic effort to emulate Mr. Endon's psychosis, a degraded image of Beckett's own creative emulation of Dante and James Joyce, who serve as his principal literary guides in this novel. Beckett's highly original adaptation of the models bequeathed to him by these predecessors include his pervasive use of chiasmic patterns in Murphy and his echoing of the story of Icarus in the narration of Murphy's own doomed flight.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[355]
    [355]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
356
    356
  • Thumbnail: Page 
357
    357
  • Thumbnail: Page 
358
    358
  • Thumbnail: Page 
359
    359
  • Thumbnail: Page 
360
    360
  • Thumbnail: Page 
361
    361
  • Thumbnail: Page 
362
    362
  • Thumbnail: Page 
363
    363
  • Thumbnail: Page 
364
    364
  • Thumbnail: Page 
365
    365