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Change, Flexibility, Spontaneity, and Self-Determination in Leisure

Stanley Parker
Social Forces
Vol. 60, No. 2, Special Issue (Dec., 1981), pp. 323-331
Published by: Oxford University Press
DOI: 10.2307/2578437
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2578437
Page Count: 9
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Change, Flexibility, Spontaneity, and Self-Determination in Leisure
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Abstract

The concepts of choice, flexibility, spontaneity, and self-determination are important in understanding forms of leisure institutions and behavior. Choice is never completely free, and numerous options do not necessarily mean qualitatively different choices. Flexibility is concerned with the timing of selected courses of action. For the individual, spontaneity is the opposite of routine and pre-planning. Self-determination describes how far the individual is free to decide the quality and conditions of his leisure behavior. Dichotomized values at the societal level of rigid/flexible institutions and at the individual level of spontaneous/programmed behavior yield four types of leisure-like manifestations: stereotyped nonwork activities, free time, recreation, and "true" leisure.

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