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Race Relations and the Nineties: Where are the Dreams of the Sixties?

Lewis M. Killian
Social Forces
Vol. 69, No. 1 (Sep., 1990), pp. 1-13
Published by: Oxford University Press
DOI: 10.2307/2579604
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2579604
Page Count: 13
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Race Relations and the Nineties: Where are the Dreams of the Sixties?
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Abstract

The sixties were marked by optimistic dreams - of a color-blind society, of black power, of reparations for oppression. Movements pursuing these goals fell short of full success but had a significant impact on society. While the right of every citizen to equality without regard to race was reaffirmed, a new principle of rights based on ethnicity emerged. Assimilation lost its luster as a goal but significant black power was not achieved. The latest report on blacks in American society shows stagnation and even decline in their economic situation. While white Americans accept the principle of racial equality, they resist efforts to implement it. There is no prospect for the radical economic reforms needed to reduce the inequalities of class and race.

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