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Leadership Succession and Security in the Philippines

JULIUS CAESAR PARREÑAS
Contemporary Southeast Asia
Vol. 15, No. 1 (June 1993), pp. 64-79
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25798183
Page Count: 16
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Leadership Succession and Security in the Philippines
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Abstract

The election of Fidel Ramos as President of the Philippines completed the full restoration of democracy in that country. While democratic institutions are in place, they are not conducive to ensuring effective and efficient administration which the Philippines requires if it is to return to economic health. One major reason for this paralysis is the fear that the country would revert back to dictatorship or authoritarianism. Thus, while every Filipino recognizes the need to have a strong President, the public also feels that the checks and balances in the system must be preserved, lest the country lapses back into authoritarianism. Compounding this is the Marcos legacy, which has not been totally erased. New élites, who have different agendas, have also emerged. This, together with the need to preserve democracy at all costs, are hampering the government's efforts to revive the country's fortunes. While the U.S. withdrawal from Subic Bay naval base and Clark air field has made the Philippines more vulnerable to external attacks, the threat to the country's security largely emanates from the domestic front. Rapid economic development is a crucial factor in ensuring political stability and preserving the country's security, but the Philippines can achieve this only if there is national unity.

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