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Political Power versus Ecological Evolutionary Forces: What are the Proximal Sources of Income Distribution?

Miles Simpson
Social Forces
Vol. 71, No. 3 (Mar., 1993), pp. 797-806
Published by: Oxford University Press
DOI: 10.2307/2579896
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2579896
Page Count: 10
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Political Power versus Ecological Evolutionary Forces: What are the Proximal Sources of Income Distribution?
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Abstract

This article examines Crenshaw's (1992) effort to reinterpret the relationship between political democracy and income inequality through ecological-evolutionary theory. His findings do not contradict the political theory of income inequality. Instead, when entered in a multiple regression, agricultural density controlling for percent of labor force in agriculture is a surrogate for land inequality. The distribution of political power remains the proximal cause of income inequality.

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