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White Male Suicide in the United States: A Multivariate Individual-Level Analysis

Augustine J. Kposowa, K. D. Breault and Gopal K. Singh
Social Forces
Vol. 74, No. 1 (Sep., 1995), pp. 315-325
Published by: Oxford University Press
DOI: 10.2307/2580634
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2580634
Page Count: 11
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White Male Suicide in the United States: A Multivariate Individual-Level Analysis
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Abstract

Using data from the 1979-85 National Longitudinal Mortality Study and multivariate hazards regression analysis, the study investigates risk factors associated with suicide mortality among white males in the U.S. (ICD-9 Codes E950-E959). Results were mixed with regard to the social integration-suicide hypothesis. Divorced or separated men and those who live alone (socially isolated) have significantly higher risks of suicide mortality. However, single and widowed men do not have a significantly greater suicide risk after controlling for key social factors such as socioeconomic status (SES). The results also show that men who live in urban areas and those who are native born are at a higher risk for suicide.

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