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Country Music and Suicide - Individual, Indirect, and Interaction Effects: A Reply to Snipes and Maguire

Steven Stack and James Gundlach
Social Forces
Vol. 74, No. 1 (Sep., 1995), pp. 331-335
Published by: Oxford University Press
DOI: 10.2307/2580636
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2580636
Page Count: 5
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Country Music and Suicide - Individual, Indirect, and Interaction Effects: A Reply to Snipes and Maguire
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Abstract

Previous work on country music and suicide has neglected individual-level data analysis of country music fans' suicide risk, use of an average annual country music exposure index, an analysis of indirect effects, and an assessment of interaction effects. The present article addresses these issues. First, country music fans are found to be at significantly higher risk of suicide than nonfans both in gun ownership and marital disruption. A significant zero-order relationship between country music and suicide does become spurious with controls when we use an average annual exposure index. However, country music exerts both indirect and interaction effects on suicide. Hence, the present article offers additional support for a link between country music and suicide.

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