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Reference Obsolescence

Constance Miller and James Rettig
RQ
Vol. 25, No. 1 (Fall 1985), pp. 52-58
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25827500
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Reference Obsolescence
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Abstract

Ideas and assumptions underlying reference service have changed very little since the 1876 publication of Samuel Green's article on reference service. Comparing the practice of and assumptions behind academic reference service today with those described by Green reveals historical underpinnings. Librarians should deliver to their users the information needed for study and research. Academic librarians must become information providers or become increasingly obsolescent.

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