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Some Experiences with the Teaching of Decision Support Systems to Management Students

John S. Edwards and John B. Kidd
The Journal of the Operational Research Society
Vol. 45, No. 4 (Apr., 1994), pp. 376-383
DOI: 10.2307/2584209
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2584209
Page Count: 8
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Some Experiences with the Teaching of Decision Support Systems to Management Students
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Abstract

There are essentially two schools of thought regarding the function of decision support systems. One is that the main purpose is to support the decision-maker in whatever style of decision-making he or she wishes. The other is that the support, while suiting the decision-maker's individual style, must also be based on an appropriate theoretical paradigm. The work with students of decision support systems reported here suggests that the latter, normative, view is not one which comes naturally to many of the students, even when working on an example where it seemed relatively easy to incorporate. Other conclusions are also presented, relating to the choice of software for decision support system development, the process of teaching about decision support systems, and group formation.

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