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Strategy in Fell Running: An Analysis of the Bob Graham Round

M. Hayes and J. M. Norman
The Journal of the Operational Research Society
Vol. 45, No. 10 (Oct., 1994), pp. 1123-1130
DOI: 10.2307/2584475
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2584475
Page Count: 8
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Strategy in Fell Running: An Analysis of the Bob Graham Round
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Abstract

The `Bob Graham Round' is an arduous route in the English Lake District which fell-runners attempt to complete in under 24 hours. Runners who complete the round and wish to have their achievement recognized must submit a detailed timetable of their progress. From an analysis of these submissions we have: (a) tested an elaboration to the well-known Naismith Rule for predicting progress in mountainous country; (b) tested the conjecture that successful athletes in stamina events apply a constant work rate; (c) estimated the effect of such additional factors as darkness or fatigue. The objective of our work is threefold. First, to help runners planning an attempt on the round. Secondly, (as the Lake District mountains are so well known and accessible) to provide any readers who are mountain walkers with an opportunity to check our estimates against their own experience and judgement. This can of course be done for any section of the route, and does not require the whole round to be tackled. Thirdly, to make our findings applicable for mountainous areas other than the Lake District.

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