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International Variation in the Business-Government Interface: Institutional and Organizational Considerations

Amy Hillman and Gerald Keim
The Academy of Management Review
Vol. 20, No. 1 (Jan., 1995), pp. 193-214
Published by: Academy of Management
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/258892
Page Count: 22
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
International Variation in the Business-Government Interface: Institutional and Organizational Considerations
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Abstract

This article combines concepts from institutional analysis in modern political economy and from organizational behavior better to understand variation in the business-government interface among major industrialized democracies. We contend that differences in business-government relations across countries can be better understood by examining the institutions through which business and government interact with particular attention to formal constraints such as rules that individuals devise and informal constraints-such as culture and norms of behavior. We also submit that attributes of the institutions involved in the interaction of business and government can be better understood by examining how individuals are attracted to, selected by, and choose to remain as members of institutions. From this theoretical framework we have developed some implications for the types of economic policies that are likely to be adopted in different countries and the tactics and strategies that businesses may use to represent their interests in public policy processes.

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