Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Bankers in English Society in the Late Nineteenth Century

Y. Cassis
The Economic History Review
Vol. 38, No. 2 (May, 1985), pp. 210-229
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Economic History Society
DOI: 10.2307/2597144
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2597144
Page Count: 20
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($16.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Bankers in English Society in the Late Nineteenth Century
Preview not available

Abstract

The correspondence between British economic policy in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century and the general interests of the City of London can be explained by the relationship between banking circles and the political elite of the country. The analysis of education, social life and marriages of a sample of 413 leading bankers between 1890 and 1914 gives clear evidence of the early integration of bankers into aristocratic circles. However, the analysis of marriages reveals that a more complete merging took place, based on a succession of marriages and intermarriages between a group of banking families and families of the landed aristocracy; the banking families included such famous banking dynasties as the Barings, the Grenfells, the Mills, the Smiths etc. The result of this merging, which did not take place on the aristocracy's terms, was the formation of a renewed elite which added the financial power of the City of London to the prestige of the old aristocracy. The identity of views between political and banking circles exempted bankers from intervening as a unified body on questions of general policy which were left to professional politicians who could be entirely relied on by the City.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
210
    210
  • Thumbnail: Page 
211
    211
  • Thumbnail: Page 
212
    212
  • Thumbnail: Page 
213
    213
  • Thumbnail: Page 
214
    214
  • Thumbnail: Page 
215
    215
  • Thumbnail: Page 
216
    216
  • Thumbnail: Page 
217
    217
  • Thumbnail: Page 
218
    218
  • Thumbnail: Page 
219
    219
  • Thumbnail: Page 
220
    220
  • Thumbnail: Page 
221
    221
  • Thumbnail: Page 
222
    222
  • Thumbnail: Page 
223
    223
  • Thumbnail: Page 
224
    224
  • Thumbnail: Page 
225
    225
  • Thumbnail: Page 
226
    226
  • Thumbnail: Page 
227
    227
  • Thumbnail: Page 
228
    228
  • Thumbnail: Page 
229
    229