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Britain and the New World Order: The Special Relationship in the 1990s

Christopher Coker
International Affairs (Royal Institute of International Affairs 1944-)
Vol. 68, No. 3 (Jul., 1992), pp. 407-421
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Royal Institute of International Affairs
DOI: 10.2307/2622963
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2622963
Page Count: 15
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Britain and the New World Order: The Special Relationship in the 1990s
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Abstract

America has emerged into the post-Cold War era as a nation needing allies more than ever before. Christopher Coker here suggests that a continuation of the special relationship between America and Britain could be seen as a consolation for a country that has lost its way, or in Britain's case, 'to legitimize its detachment from Europe and to justify its apparent wayward attitude to a future that clearly lies with Europe'.

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