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The Peace Process in Northern Ireland

Kevin Boyle and Tom Hadden
International Affairs (Royal Institute of International Affairs 1944-)
Vol. 71, No. 2 (Apr., 1995), pp. 269-283
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Royal Institute of International Affairs
DOI: 10.2307/2623434
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2623434
Page Count: 15
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The Peace Process in Northern Ireland
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Abstract

The paramilitaries' ceasefires of September-October 1994 in Northern Ireland have offered the best hope in the past twenty-five years of a resolution of the conflict. Such resolution, however, is by no means a foregone conclusion: as the authors of this article point out, it is just as possible to project a scenario in which the armed conflict resumes as one in which it is permanently doused. In this review of the peace process as it currently stands, they examine in turn the nature of the conflict, the background to the ceasefires, the evolution of the peace process up to February 1995 and the prospects for its further development. Cautioning against the drawing of inappropriate parallels with intercommunal conflicts in other areas of the world, they point out the aspects of other situations that may offer both warning and encouragement.

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