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Between the Crescent and the Star-Spangled Banner: American Muslims and US Foreign Policy

Ali A. Mazrui
International Affairs (Royal Institute of International Affairs 1944-)
Vol. 72, No. 3, Ethnicity and International Relations (Jul., 1996), pp. 493-506
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Royal Institute of International Affairs
DOI: 10.2307/2625553
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2625553
Page Count: 14
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Between the Crescent and the Star-Spangled Banner: American Muslims and US Foreign Policy
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Abstract

The author notes that while Muslims are as numerous asJews in the United States, they wield only a fraction of the influence on politics, specifically on foreign policy. Identifying four aspects of the American Muslim identity-national origin, racial affiliation, religious affiliation and American affiliation-he examines how these affect the views ofAmerican Muslims towards US foreign policy. He notes the conflicting attractions of the two main US political parties for American Muslims and the role played by the Nation of Islam under Louis Farrakhan. He concludes with an analysis of the diferences between 'indigenous' and 'immigrant' Muslim Americans.

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