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Identification of Three Classes of Cytosolic Glutathione Transferase Common to Several Mammalian Species: Correlation between Structural Data and Enzymatic Properties

Bengt Mannervik, Per angstrom lin, Claes Guthenberg, Helgi Jensson, M. Kalim Tahir, Margareta Warholm and Hans Jornvall
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 82, No. 21 (Nov. 1, 1985), pp. 7202-7206
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/26337
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Identification of Three Classes of Cytosolic Glutathione Transferase Common to Several Mammalian Species: Correlation between Structural Data and Enzymatic Properties
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Abstract

The major isoenzymes of cytosolic glutathione transferase (EC 2.5.1.18) from rat, mouse, and man are shown to share structural and catalytic properties that can be used for species-independent classification. Rat, mouse, and human isoenzymes were grouped with respect to amino-terminal amino acid sequences, after correlation of seven structures analyzed in the present investigation with structures determined earlier. The isoenzymes were also characterized by substrate specificities and sensitivities to inhibitors, and the data were subjected to pattern recognition analysis. In addition, the various isoenzymes were tested for cross-reactivity by immunoprecipitation with antibodies raised against rat and human transferases. The different types of data were clearly correlated and afforded an unambiguous division of the isoenzymes into three classes named alpha, mu, and pi. Each of the three mammalian species studied contains at least one isoenzyme of each class. It is suggested that the similarities of the isoenzymes in a class reflect evolutionary relationships and that the classification applies generally.

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