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Resistance and Virulence Structure in Two Linum marginale-Melampsora lini Host-Pathogen Metapopulations with Different Mating Systems

J. J. Burdon, P. H. Thrall and A. H. D. Brown
Evolution
Vol. 53, No. 3 (Jun., 1999), pp. 704-716
DOI: 10.2307/2640711
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2640711
Page Count: 13
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Resistance and Virulence Structure in Two Linum marginale-Melampsora lini Host-Pathogen Metapopulations with Different Mating Systems
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Abstract

Different patterns of resistance to six pathotypes of Melampsora lini were detected in 11 populations of Linum marginale distributed across two metapopulations. The two metapopulations (mountains and plains of New South Wales, Australia) differed in the annual cycle of disease development, which barely overlapped, and in the growth cycle and mating system of the host. Host populations in the mountains metapopulation were highly inbred, whereas those on the plains showed appreciable levels of outcrossing. Within each metapopulation there was significant variation among component populations in (1) levels of host resistance to individual pathogen isolates; (2) mean levels of resistance to all six isolates; (3) the number of resistance phenotypes present and the evenness of their distribution within the population; and (4) the average number of pathogen lines to which individual hosts were resistant. A more limited comparison of pathogen populations from the two metapopulations (two from each) found greater similarities in the structure of populations and particular virulence frequencies within, rather than among, the two metapopulations. Differences in host outcrossing rates between the two metapopulations are reflected in marked differences in the overall level of resistance, its partitioning within and among populations, the number and distribution of resistance phenotypes in the two areas, and the level of polymorphism for specific virulence factors in the pathogen, with the plains metapopulation showing consistently higher values. However, these differences were not significant. In general, variation for all parameters was just as great among populations within a metapopulation as between the two metapopulations.

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